Exam results revealed in NCTJ end-of-year reports

The NCTJ has published three end-of-year reports, which analyse exam results from NCTJ qualifications sat in the 2018-19 academic year.

The National Qualification in Journalism (NQJ) examiners’ report reveals that a total of 69 candidates sat the new Level 6 qualification across July and November 2019. Over the two sittings, a total of 63 per cent of trainees passed the NQJ, becoming qualified senior reporters.

Writing in his chief examiner’s summary, Andy Martin said: “I would like to offer my sincere congratulations to all those who have achieved the qualification since July and lots of encouragement to those who haven’t quite made it this time around.

“The NQJ results have been extremely heartening. The new assessments reflect the reality of daily life in the newsroom today with all the pressures, challenges and demands upon multimedia journalists.

“We can be confident that the NQJ gives today’s journalists the very best and most relevant platform upon which to build their career, equipping them to carry out a role that arguably has never been more important.”

The Diploma in Journalism examiners’ report for 2018-19 has revealed that 94 per cent of diploma candidates achieved pass grades, the same as in 2017-18. Across 8,192 exam sittings this year, 66 per cent of candidates achieved gold standard exam results, compared to 69 per cent in 2017-19.

In her principal examiner’s summary, Amanda Ball said: “Overall, the 2018-19 results are encouraging and show that the number of candidates achieving the gold standard in each subject is generally consistent with previous years.

“The NCTJ’s commitment to maintaining standards and relevance continues to be well received by candidates and industry alike.”

The annual quality assurance and standards report has also been published on the NCTJ website. The report is compiled to help explain the work of the committee, and to share some of the data it examines, reviews and debates, to ensure the reliability and transparency of NCTJ services.

Sean Dooley, chairman of the NCTJ’s quality assurance and standards committee, said: “Our fluctuating media landscape now drives the need to reappraise and refine existing qualifications on an ever-shortening time cycle, and innovation has again been at the forefront of service.

“The landmark NQJ for news journalists was delivered in July with stimulating feedback. Other initiatives include the piloting of elective options on data and digital audience journalism and the development of an NQJ for community journalists.”

He added: “Ultimately the best indication of achievement rests with the customer base. And, as measured by the Student Council feedback, it is clear the crypto currency known as the NCTJ kitemark has once again shown a healthy rise in value.”

You can also read the charity’s annual report for 2018-19, which was published last week.